Master Of Masters!!!


One day, Jesus and St. Peter were walking through a village, when they came to a blacksmith shop.

 

Peter gave Jesus a nudge. “Lord, look at that.”

 

Jesus looked above the door and saw a sign saying, “Master of Masters.”

 

“Hmm,” said Jesus. “Let’s look into this.”

 

Inside, the blacksmith was at his forge, pounding on a horseshoe.

 

“I saw the sign over your door,” said Jesus. “What does it mean?”

 

“Can’t you read?” said the smith. “It means what it says. I’m the Master of Masters.”

 

“That’s quite a coincidence,” said Jesus. “That’s what people call me.”

 

“Then they’d better stop,” said the smith. “I’m the greatest blacksmith that ever lived. That makes me the Master of Masters.”

 

Just then, a man came in, saying, “Blacksmith, my horse is outside. Will you shoe it for me?”

 

“Certainly,” said the smith. “Come back for it in an hour.”

 

When the man had left, Jesus asked, “Mind if I try my hand at it?”

 

The smith looked him up and down. “I guess you can’t do so much harm that I can’t put it right.”

 

Now, usually, to shoe a horse, you pull the shoe off the horse’s hoof, heat the shoe in the fire, hammer it at the anvil to bend up the ends, then nail it back on the hoof. But that’s not what Jesus did.

 

He took hold of one of the horse’s legs and gave a little tug.

 

Pop! The leg came right off. He carried it inside, stuck the hoof in the fire, then laid it on the anvil and bent up the shoe. Then he carried the leg back outside and—pop!—stuck it back on the horse.

 

“Never saw that trick before,” said the smith. “Mind if I try it?”

 

“Be my guest,” said Jesus.

 

The smith took hold of another leg and tugged and tugged. But all he got for his trouble was a kick from the horse.

 

“Watch me again,” said Jesus.

 

He took hold of the leg—pop!—pulled it off, brought it inside to the fire, bent the shoe at the anvil, and stuck the leg back on the horse—pop! Then he went around and did the same with the other two legs.

 

“I have to admit, I’m impressed,” said the smith.

 

“That’s nothing,” said Jesus. “Watch this.

 

A man with a hunchback was passing by. Jesus said, “Sir, let me relieve you of that burden.”

 

“Are you mocking me?” asked the man angrily.

 

“Not at all,” said Jesus. “Please come into the shop.”

 

Jesus brought the man inside, picked him up, and stuck his hump in the fire. Then he laid him on the anvil and picked up the blacksmith’s hammer. Whomp! whomp! whomp! He pounded that man’s back as straight as a ruler.

 

Jesus set him down. The man cried, “Hallelujah!”, jumped six feet in the air, and raced on down the street.

 

“Never saw that trick, either,” said the smith. “Mind if I try that one, too?”

 

“I wouldn’t, if I were you,” said Jesus. “It’s tougher than it looks.”

 

“I imagine you’re right,” said the smith. He went straight outside and took down his sign. And he never again called himself the Master of Masters.

 

Cheers,

 

SRK

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The Great Escape !!!


The Great Escape!!!

 

Once upon a time, there was a bird in a cage who sang for her merchant owner.

 

He took delight in her song day and night, and was so fond of her that he served her water in a golden dish.

 

Before he left for a business trip, he asked the bird if she had a wish:

 

“I will go through the forest where you were born, past the birds of your old neighborhood.

 

What message should I take for them?”

 

The bird said,

 

“Tell them I sit full of sorrow in a cage singing my captive song. Day and night, my heart is full of grief. I hope it will not be long before I see my friends again and fly freely through the trees. Bring me a message from the lovely forest, which will set my heart at ease. Oh, I yearn for my Beloved, to fly with him, and spread my wings. Until then there is no joy for me, and I am cut off from all of life’s sweet things.”

 

The merchant traveled on his donkey through the dense forest.

 

He listened to the melodies of many birds.

 

When the merchant reached the forest where his bird came from, he stopped, pushed his hood back, and said,

 

“O you birds! Greetings to you all from my pretty bird locked in her cage. She sends tidings of her love to you and wants to tell of her plight. She asks for a reply that will ease her heart. My love for her keeps her captive with bars all around her. She wants to join her Beloved and sing her songs through the air with a free heart, but I would miss her beautiful songs and cannot let her go.”

 

All the birds listened to the merchant’s words.

 

Suddenly one bird shrieked and fell from a tree brunch to the ground.

 

The merchant froze to the spot where he stood.

 

Nothing could astound him more than this did.

 

One bird had fallen down dead!

 

The merchant continued on to the city and traded his goods.

 

At last he returned to his home.

 

He did not know what to tell his bird when she asked what message he had brought.

 

He stood before her cage and said, “Oh, nothing to speak of no, no.”

 

The bird cried, “I must know at once.”

 

I do not know what happened, said the merchant.

 

“I told them your message. Then, one of them fell down dead.”

 

Suddenly the merchant’s bird let out a terrible shriek and fell on her head to the bottom of the cage.

 

The merchant was horrified.

 

He wept in despair, “Oh, what have I done?”

 

He cried,

 

“What Have I done? Now my life means nothing. My moon has gone and so has my sun. Now my own bird is dead.”

 

He opened the cage door, reached in, and took her into his hands gently and carefully.

 

“I will have to bury her now,” he said; “poor thing is dead.”

 

Suddenly, the moment he had lifted the bird out of the cage, she swooped up, flew out of the window and landed on the nearest roof slope.

 

She turned to him and said, gratefully,

 

“Thank you, merchant master, for delivering my message. That bird’s reply instructed me how to win my freedom. All I had to do was to be dead. I gained my freedom when I chose to die.”

 

“So now I fly to my Beloved who waits for me. Good-bye, good-bye, my master no longer.”

 

“My bird was wise; she taught me secret,” the merchant reflected.

 

If you want to be with the ones you love, you must be ready to give up everything.

 

Cheers,

 

SRK

Judo Master Sensei !!!


Judo Champion

 

Sometimes your biggest weakness can become your biggest strength.

 

Take, for example, the story of one 10-year-old boy who decided to study Judo despite the fact that he had lost his left arm in a devastating car accident.

 

The boy began lessons with an old Japanese Judo Master Sensei.

 

The boy was doing well, so he couldn’t understand why, after three months of training the master had taught him only one move.

 

“Sensei,” the boy finally said, “Shouldn’t I be learning more moves?”

 

“This is the only move you know, but this is the only move you’ll ever need to know,” the Sensei replied.

 

Not quite understanding, but believing in his teacher, the boy kept training.

 

Several months later, the Sensei took the boy to his first tournament.

 

Surprising himself, the boy easily won his first two matches.

 

The third match proved to be more difficult, but after some time, his opponent became impatient and charged; the boy deftly used his one move to win the match.

 

Still amazed by his success, the boy was now in the finals.

 

This time, his opponent was bigger, stronger, and more experienced.

 

For a while, the boy appeared to be overmatched.

 

Concerned that the boy might get hurt, the referee called a time-out.

 

He was about to stop the match when the sensei intervened.

 

“No,” the Sensei insisted, “Let him continue.”

 

Soon after the match resumed, his opponent made a critical mistake: he dropped his guard.

 

Instantly, the boy used his move to pin him.

 

The boy had won the match and the tournament.

 

He was the champion.

 

On the way home, the boy and Sensei reviewed every move in each and every match.

 

Then the boy summoned the courage to ask what was really on his mind.

 

“Sensei, how did I win the tournament with only one move?”

 

“You won for two reasons,” the Sensei answered.

 

“First, you’ve almost mastered one of the most difficult throws in all of Judo. And second, the only known defense for that move is for your opponent to grab your left arm.”

 

The boy’s biggest weakness had become his biggest strength.

 

Urs,

 

SRK

History does have its lessons!!!


Triple Filter Test

 

On this Occasion of Christmas, I just want to share an useful stuff from the history to you all….

 

Be sure to read all the way to the end… It’s worth it…Next time someone starts to gossip, think of this..!

 

In ancient Greece (469 – 399 BC), Socrates was widely lauded for his wisdom.

 

One day the great philosopher came upon an acquaintance who ran up to him excitedly and said, “Socrates, do you know what I just heard about one of your students?”

 

“Wait a moment! “Socrates replied. “Before you tell me I’d like you to pass a little test. It’s called the Triple Filter Test.”

 

“Triple Filter?”

 

“That’s right,” Socrates replied. “Before you talk to me about my student let’s take a moment to filter what you’re going to say”

 

The first filter is Truth.

 

“Have you made absolutely sure that what you about to tell me is true?”

 

“No,” the man said, “actually I just heard about it and…” “All right,” said Socrates. “So you don’t really know if it’s true or not.

 

Now let’s try the second filter, the filter of goodness.

 

Is what you are about to tell me about my student something good?”

 

“No, on the contrary…”

 

“So,” Socrates continued, “You want to tell me something bad about him, even though you are not certain it’s true?”

 

The man struggled, a little embarrassed.

 

Socrates continued. “You may still pass the test though, because there is a third filter – the filter of usefulness.

 

Is what you want to tell me about my student going to be useful to me?”

 

“No, not really… ”

 

“Well,” concluded Socrates, “if what you want to tell me is neither True nor Good nor even Useful! Why tell it to me at all?”

 

The man was defeated and ashamed.

 

This is the reason Socrates was a great philosopher and held in such high esteem.

 

It also explains why he never found out that Plato (his student) was having an affair with his wife.

 

History does have its lessons…. We have a lot to learn from it…

 

Merry Christmas to all of you!!! 

 

 Cheers,

 

 SRK