You Could Make A Difference!!!


You Could Make A Difference!!! 

 

 Her name was Mrs. Aruna. As she stood in front of her 5th grade class on the very first day of school, she told the children a lie.

 Like most teachers, she looked at her students and said that she loved them all the same.

 But that was impossible, because there in the front row, slumped in his seat, was a little boy named Raja Raman.

 Mrs. Aruna had watched Raja the year before and noticed that he didn’t play well with the other children, that his clothes were messy and that he constantly needed a bath.

 And Raja could be unpleasant. 

It got to the point where Mrs. Aruna would actually take delight in marking his papers with a broad red pen, making bold X’s and then putting a big “F” at the top of his papers.

 At the school where Mrs. Aruna taught, she was required to review each child’s past records and she put Raja’s off until last.

However, when she reviewed his file, she was in for a surprise. 

Raja’s first grade teacher wrote, “Raja is a bright child with a ready laugh. He does his work neatly and has good manners…he is a joy to be around.”

 His second grade teacher wrote, “Raja is an excellent student, well liked by his classmates, but he is troubled because his mother has a terminal illness and life at home must be a struggle.” 

His third grade teacher wrote, “His mother’s death had been hard on him. He tries to do his best, but his father doesn’t show much interest and his home life will soon affect him if some steps aren’t taken.” 

Raja’s fourth grade teacher wrote, “Raja is withdrawn and doesn’t show much interest in school. He doesn’t have many friends and he sometimes sleeps in class.”

By now, Mrs. Aruna realized the problem and she was ashamed of herself. 

She felt even worse when her students brought her New Year presents, wrapped in beautiful ribbons and bright paper, except for Raja’s. 

His present was clumsily wrapped in the heavy, brown paper that he got from a grocery bag. 

Mrs. Aruna took pains to open it in the middle of the other presents. Some of the children started to laugh when she found a rhinestone bracelet with some of the stones missing, and a bottle that was one quarter full of perfume. 

But she stifled the children’s laughter when she exclaimed how pretty the bracelet was, putting it on, and dabbing some of the perfume on her wrist. 

Raja Raman stayed after school that day just long enough to say, “Mrs. Aruna, today you smelled just like my Mom used to”. After the children left she cried for at least an hour.

On that very day, she quit teaching reading, and writing, and arithmetic. Instead, she began to teach children. 

Mrs. Aruna paid particular attention to Raja. As she worked with him, his mind seemed to come alive. The more she encouraged him, the faster he responded.

By the end of the year, Raja had become one of smartest children in the class and, despite her lie that she would love all the children the same, Raja became one of her “teacher’s pets.”

A year later, she found a note under her door, from Raja, telling her that she was the best teacher he ever had in his whole life.

Six years went by before she got another note from Raja. He then wrote that he had finished high school, third in his class, and she was still the best teacher he ever had in his whole life.

Four years after that, she got another letter, saying that while things had been tough at times, he’d stayed in school, had stuck with it, and would soon graduate from college with the highest of honors. 

He assured Mrs. Aruna that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had in his whole life. 

Then four more years passed and yet another letter came. This time he explained that after he got his bachelor’s degree, he decided to go a little further. 

The letter explained that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had. But now his name was little longer – the letter was signed, F. Raman, MD.

The story doesn’t end there. You see, there was yet another letter that spring. Raja said he’d met this girl and was going to be married. 

He explained that his father had died a couple of years ago and he was wondering if Mrs. Aruna might agree to sit in the place at the wedding that was usually reserved for the mother of the groom. 

Of course, Mrs. Aruna did. And guess what? She wore that bracelet, the one with several rhinestones missing. And she made sure she was wearing the perfume that Raja remembered his mother wearing on their last Christmas together.

They hugged each other, and Dr. Raman whispered in Mrs. Aruna’s ear, “Thank you Mrs. Aruna for believing in me. Thank you so much for making me feel important and showing me that I could make a difference.”

Mrs. Aruna, with tears in her eyes, whispered back. She said, “Raja, you have it all wrong. You were the one who taught me that I could make a difference. I didn’t know how to teach until I met you.”

Please remember that wherever you go, and whatever you do, you will have the opportunity to touch and / or change a person’s outlook. Please try to do it in a positive way. 

Urs, 

SRK

Dear Sister!!!


Dear Sister!!!

 

A rich lady had adopted a poor orphan girl, who was very devoted, obedient, laborious, and always happy and kind.

One day the lady said to her: “Rose, you are a good girl and therefore for Christmas I shall buy some new clothes for you. I have already spoken to the shop-keeper about it. Here is the money; go and buy the smart dress that you desire so much.”

The lady gave her some money, but Rose, considering the sum for a moment, said:

“My dear mother, I have enough clothes for the present, while my sister Lucia is still poorly dressed and if she saw me with a new dress she would certainly feel a little sad. Will you allow me to send her the money? She is very fond of me and when I was ill she used to come to my beside and be the most loving nurse.”

“My dear children,” said the good lady, “write to your sister and tell her to come here and stay with us, and I will give the same to both of you. Since you both have the same love for each other, I shall do my best to keep both of you happy.”

For there is no friend like a sister

In calm or stormy weather,

To cheer one on the tedious way,

To fetch one if one goes astray.

Those who are blessed with sisters will feel it…

 Urs,

 SRK

Mango Fruit!!!


The Last Wish!!!

 

Once when King Sri Krishna Deva Rayalu was ruling the Vijaya Nagar Empire, the royal mother fell sick and was bedridden.

The medical professionals of the court declared that there was no chance for her to survive this episode and that she grew too old to respond to any medication.

One morning, she summoned Rayalu to her presence.

“My Dear Son! I realize that I am close to death’s door. I also do not have any hopes that my health would become better. However, I have a last wish.”

She paused and asked, “Can you accomplish it for me before my soul is taken away?”

Rayalu was the King of Kings. His mother was on the deathbed, expressing her last wish.

How could he turn away from it? He gently said, “Mother! Please tell me I will definitely accomplish your last wish” he assured.

“I…” she added, “…wish to eat a mango fruit, can you get me one?” in a feeble tone the mother asked Rayalu.

It was early summer. Trees had just started bearing tender fruits.

There was no guarantee that royal mother would live until the tender ones ripened on the tree, Rayalu thought.

It was also an insult to his royalty, if he was unable to fulfil his mother’s last wish.

Immediately the King ordered his soldiers to scan through the fields of the kingdom and bring some ripe mangoes at any cost, immediately.

The soldiers plunged into action. They did their best and returned with a basket filled with ripe mangoes.

Eventually, just before the soldiers could place the basket before their King, king’s mother breathed her last.

Rayalu was taken aback, for being unable to fulfil the last wish more than for her demise.

He was shook deeply with the thought that his mother was dead even before her quench for mangoes was fulfilled.

He slowly started to sink day after the day with the thoughts that were ripping him.

Rayalu invited Royal Master Thathacharya, explained his struggle, and sought an advice that would take the suffering off from him.

Thathacharya thought for a while and told the King, “My king! Your mother was fond of giving alms to the poor and needy.

Her soul would rest in peace, if you can fulfil her last wish through donations. Order for preparing mangoes with gold and distribute them to Brahmins of the country.”

The news spread like wildfire in the kingdom that Rayalu was doling out golden mangoes to Brahmins in the memory of his mother.

Brahmins from all over the empire started flooding into the capital to accept the golden mango from the King. Day in and out, long queues were always seen only to add people to its tail.

With this, the gold reserves in the exchequer were melting down rapidly.

Rayalu not bothering about the consequences was incessantly involved in donating golden mangoes to the Brahmins.

He never heeded to the pleas and warnings of the Chief Minister Thimmarusu in this regard.

Thimmarusu was in confusion and did not know how to stop the King.

He approached Ramalinga and urged for a solution to this in the interest of the kingdom and its people.

Ramalinga assured Thimmarusu that he would check it at the earliest.

“Go home and have a sound night sleep, Chief Minister. Everything will be alright by tomorrow evening” Ramalinga sent off Thimmarusu.

Next morning, Ramalinga went near the long queues and watched what was happening.

He then selected a yard close to the queues and sat there, ordering the queue maintenance persons to send each of the Brahmins to him before sending him to Rayalu for the golden mango.

Everyone knew that Ramalinga was one of the close associates of the King.

They thought that Ramalinga was doing so on the orders of the King and started sending the Brahmins first to Ramalinga before sending them into the palace.

Ramalinga told every Brahmin that there was a slight amendment to the donation process.

“The King Rayalu wished to donate the golden mangoes to those who bore a blister from him” Ramalinga explained.

Brahmins desirous of the gold first had a burn on their backs and went for the King’s gold.

This went on until afternoon. In the later afternoon, one Brahmin pleaded Ramalinga to give him two burns and two golden mangoes.

Ramalinga immediately fulfilled the Brahmins wish.

Then the Brahmin approached Rayalu. As usual, Rayalu handed him one mango.

The Brahmin immediately requested the King, “My Lord! I had two burns please give me two golden mangoes.”

The King Rayalu did not understand what was happening. He enquired, “What burns?”

Then the Brahmin narrated the entire story about Ramalinga and burns to Rayalu.

The King shivering with anger called for Ramalinga and questioned him, “Ramalinga, what is happening. Why are you doing this brutality on these poor and innocent Brahmins?”

Ramalinga very politely and innocently, as if nothing was amiss, explained. “My Dear King! I am an unlucky person.

Recently my mother succumbed to a chronic disease. She wished all during her bed ridden period to cauterize her back so that she could become healthy and live longer.”

Wiping the tears dropping on his cheeks, Ramalinga continued, “Probably she would have lived. Nevertheless, I did not heed to her requests.

She died with it on her lips. I thought of presenting it to the Brahmins, as I failed to fulfill my mother’s last wish.

However, I being a poor man cannot invite such huge number of Brahmins. Anyway, all of these had come on your invitation and I am trying to fulfill my mother’s last wish in this manner.

With all due respects to the King, I beg for pardon for my deeds, if I am wrong.”

Rayalu analyzed that Ramalinga was attempting to teach him a lesson. He then recalled Thimmarusu’s pleas about the drastically dropping gold reserves in the exchequer.

Appreciating the presence of mind and loyalty, Rayalu immediately stopped the programme.

Urs,

SRK