Story of Appreciation


Story of Appreciation

One young academically excellent person went to apply for a managerial position in a big company.

He passed the first interview; the director did the last interview, made the last decision. The director discovered from the CV that the youth’s academic achievements were excellent all the way, from the secondary school until the postgraduate research, never had a year when he did not score.

The director asked, “Did you obtain any scholarships in school?” the youth answered “none”.

The director asked, “Was it your father who paid for your school fees?” The youth answered, “My father passed away when I was one year old, it was my mother who paid for my school fees.

The director asked, “Where did your mother work?” The youth answered, “My mother worked as clothes cleaner. The director requested the youth to show his hands. The youth showed a pair of hands that were smooth and perfect.

The director asked, “Have you ever helped your mother wash the clothes before?” The youth answered, “Never, my mother always wanted me to study and read more books. Furthermore, my mother can wash clothes faster than me.

The director said, “I have a request. When you go back today, go and clean your mother’s hands, and then see me tomorrow morning*

The youth felt that his chance of landing the job was high. When he went back, he happily requested his mother to let him clean her hands. His mother felt strange, happy but with mixed feelings, she showed her hands to the kid.

The youth cleaned his mother’s hands slowly. His tear fell as he did that. It was the first time he noticed that his mother’s hands were so wrinkled, and there were so many bruises in her hands. Some bruises were so painful that his mother shivered when they were cleaned with water.

This was the first time the youth realized that it was this pair of hands that washed the clothes everyday to enable him to pay the school fee. The bruises in the mother’s hands were the price that the mother had to pay for his graduation, academic excellence and his future.

After finishing the cleaning of his mother hands, the youth quietly washed all the remaining clothes for his mother. That night, mother and son talked for a very long time.

Next morning, the youth went to the director’s office. The Director noticed the tears in the youth’s eyes, asked: “Can you tell me that have you done and learned yesterday in your house?”

The youth answered, “I cleaned my mother’s hand, and also finished cleaning all the remaining clothes’

The Director asked, “Please tell me your feelings.” The youth said, Number 1, I know now what appreciation is. Without my mother, there would not the successful me today. Number 2, by working together and helping my mother, only I now realize how difficult and tough it is to get something done. Number 3, I have come to appreciate the importance and value of family relationship.

The director said, “This is what I am looking for to be my manager. I want to recruit a person who can appreciate the help of others, a person who knows the sufferings of  others to get things done, and a person who would not put money as his only goal in life. You are hired.

Later on, this young person worked very hard, and received the respect of his subordinates. Every employee worked diligently and as a team. The company’s performance improved tremendously.

A child, who has been protected and habitually given whatever he wanted, would develop “entitlement mentality” and would always put him first. He would be ignorant of his parent’s efforts. When he starts work, he assumes that every person must listen to him, and when he becomes a manager, he would never know the sufferings of his employees and would always blame others. For this kind of people, who may be good academically, may be successful for a while, but eventually would not feel sense of achievement. He will grumble and be full of hatred and fight for more. If we are this kind of protective parents, are we really showing love or are we destroying the kid instead?*

You can let your kid live in a big house, eat a good meal, learn piano, watch a big screen TV. But when you are cutting grass, please let them experience it. After a meal, let them wash their plates and bowls together with their brothers and sisters. It is not because you do not have money to hire a maid, but it is because you want to love them in a right way. You want them to understand, no matter how rich their parents are, one day their hair will grow gray, same as the mother of that young person. The most important thing is your kid learns how to appreciate the effort and experience the difficulty and learns the ability to work with others to get things done.

You would have forwarded many mails to many and many of them would have back mailed you too…but try and forward this story to as many as possible…this may change somebody’s fate… Don’t you think so………………

Endrum Anbudan,
S.R.Karthik
Mail Me @ srksrv786@gmail.com
Visit Me @ https://evergreensrk.wordpress.com

 

Who is Smarter?


Gold Vs Silver

 

There once lived a great mathematician in a village outside Ujjain.

 

He was often called by the local king to advice on matters related to the economy.

 

His reputation had spread as far as Taxila in the North and Kanchi in the South.

 

So it hurt him very much when the village headman told him, “You may be a great mathematician who advises the king on economic matters but your son does not know the value of gold or silver.”

 

The mathematician called his son and asked, “What is more valuable – gold or silver?” “Gold,” said the son.

 

“That is correct. Why is it then that the village headman makes fun of you, claims you do not know the value of gold or silver? He teases me every day. He mocks me before other village elders as a father who neglects his son. This hurts me. I feel everyone in the village is laughing behind my back because you do not know what is more valuable, gold or silver. Explain this to me, son.”

 

So the son of the mathematician told his father the reason why the village headman carried this impression.

 

“Every day on my way to school, the village headman calls me to his house.

 

There, in front of all village elders, he holds out a silver coin in one hand and a gold coin in other.

 

He asks me to pick up the more valuable coin.

 

I pick the silver coin. He laughs, the elders jeer, everyone makes fun of me.

 

And then I go to school. This happens every day.

 

That is why they tell you I do not know the value of gold or silver.”

 

The father was confused.

 

His son knew the value of gold and silver, and yet when asked to choose between a gold coin and silver coin always picked the silver coin.

 

“Why don’t you pick up the gold coin?” he asked. In response, the son took the father to his room and showed him a box.

 

In the box were at least a hundred silver coins.

 

Turning to his father, the mathematician’ s son said, “The day I pick up the gold coin the game will stop. They will stop having fun and I will stop making money.”

 

The bottom line is…

 

Sometimes in life, we have to play the fool because our seniors and our peers, and sometimes even our juniors like it.

 

That does not mean we lose in the game of life.

 

It just means allowing others to win in one arena of the game, while we win in the other arena of the game.

 

We have to choose which arena matters to us and which arenas do not.

 

Urs,

 

S.R.Karthik

Love your Job Not your Company


Love your job and not your company

 

Today morning one of my colleague sent this email conversation and its really excellent.

These are practical lines that each and every employee should read especially software engineers like us where there is always a confusion for the employees towards their company loyalty vs their financial stability.

Interesting. …..Don’t miss last 2 Questions…

Some, rather most organizations reject his CV today because he has changed jobs frequently (10 in 14 years). My friend, the job hopper (referred here as Mr. JH), does not mind it. well he does not need to mind it at all.

Having worked full-time with 10 employer companies in just 14 years gives Mr. JH the relaxing edge that most of the company loyal employees are struggling for today. Today, Mr. JH too is laid off like some other 14-15 year experienced guys the difference being the latter have just worked in 2-3 organizations in the same number of years. Here are the excerpts of an interview with Mr. JH:

Q: Why have you changed 10 jobs in 14 years?

A: To get financially sound and stable before getting laid off the second time.

Q: So you knew you would be laid off in the year 2009?

A: Well I was laid off first in the year 2002 due to the first global economic slowdown. I had not got a full-time job before January 2003 when the economy started looking up; so I had struggled for almost a year without job and with compromises.

Q: Which number of job was that?

A: That was my third job.

Q: So from Jan 2003 to Jan 2009, in 6 years, you have changed 8 jobs to make the count as 10 jobs in 14 years?

A: I had no other option. In my first 8 years of professional life, I had worked only for 2 organizations thinking that jobs are deserved after lot of hard work and one should stay with an employer company to justify the saying employer loyalty. But I was an idiot.

Q: Why do you say so?

A: My salary in the first 8 years went up only marginally. I could not save enough and also, I had thought that I had a permanent job, so I need not worry about what will I do if I lose my job. I could never imagine losing a job because of economic slowdown and not because of my performance. That was January 2002.

Q: Can you brief on what happened between January 2003 and 2009.

A: Well, I had learnt my lessons of being company loyal and not money earning and saving loyal. But then you can save enough only when you earn enough. So I shifted my loyalty towards money making and saving I changed 8 jobs in 6 years assuring all my interviewers about my stability.

Q: So you lied to your interviewers; you had already planned to change the job for which you were being interviewed on a particular day?

A: Yes, you can change jobs only when the market is up and companies are hiring. You tell me can I get a job now because of the slowdown? No. So one should change jobs for higher salaries only when the market is up because that is the only time when companies hire and can afford the expected salaries.

Q: What have you gained by doing such things?

A: Thats the question I was waiting for. In Jan 2003, I had a fixed salary (without variables) of say Rs. X p.a. In January 2009, my salary was 8X. So assuming my salary was Rs.3 lakh p.a. in Jan 2003, my last drawn salary in Jan 2009 was Rs.24 lakh p.a. (without variable). I never bothered about variable as I had no intention to stay for 1 year and go through the appraisal process to wait for the company to give me a hike.

Q: So you decided on your own hike?

A: Yes, in 2003, I could see the slowdown coming again in future like it had happened in 2001-02. Though I was not sure by when the next slowdown would come, I was pretty sure I wanted a debt-free life before being laid off again. So I planned my hike targets on a yearly basis without waiting for the year to complete.

Q: So are you debt-free now?

A: Yes, I earned so much by virtue of job changes for money and spent so little that today I have a loan free 2 BR flat (1200 sq. feet) plus a loan free big car without bothering about any EMIs. I am laid off too but I do not complain at all. If I have laid off companies for money, it is OK if a company lays me off because of lack of money.

Q: Who is complaining?

A: All those guys who are not getting a job to pay their EMIs off are complaining. They had made fun of me saying I am a job hopper and do not have any company loyalty. Now I ask them what they gained by their company loyalty; they too are laid off like me and pass comments to me why will you bother about us, you are already debt-free. They were still in the bracket of 12-14 lakh p.a. when they were laid off.

Q: What is your advice to professionals?

A: Like Narayan Murthy had said love your job and not your company because you never know when your company will stop loving you. In the same lines, love yourself and your family needs more than the companys needs. Companies can keep coming and going; family will always remain the same. Make money for yourself first and simultaneously make money for the company, not the other way around.

Q: What is your biggest pain point with companies?

A: When a company does well, its CEO etc will address the entire company saying, well done guys, it is YOUR company, keep up the hard work, I am with you. But when the slowdown happens and the company does not do so well, the same CEO Etc will say, It is MY company and to save the company, I have to take tough decisions including asking people to go. So think about your financial stability first; when you get laid off, your kids will complain to you and not your boss

Evergreen Wishes,

 S.R.Karthik

Mail To: srksrv786@gmail.com

Visit Me @ https://evergreensrk.wordpress.com

Bengal Tiger!!!


King of Wild Beasts!!!

This is one of the famous stories believed in Bengal about a fakir, Gazi Saheb. His story is similar to our Sai Baba from Shridi.

To the boatmen of the river Hooghly, and the woodcutters and honey gatherers of the Sunderbans, “Gazi Saheb” is a name that is still invoked in times of storm or stress.

Stories of the magical powers of this wonder-worker have been preserved in song and legend.

South of Calcutta, where the town of Baruipur stands, there was once dense, impenetrable jungle, laced with crocodile-infested creeks.

Into this wasteland came a fakir, Mobrah Gazi by name, to take up his abode at a place called Basre. He so overawed the wild beasts that they became his slaves; and the “Gazi Saheb”, as he came to be known, was often seen riding about on a tiger.

It is said that the Zamindar of the pargana in which Basra was situated was placed under arrest because he was unable to pay the annual revenue to the Emperor at Delhi.

The Zamindar’s mother, fearing for her son’s life sought the assistance of the great Gazi. The fakir promised him aid.

After sending the woman who served him as a devotee home, he dismounted from his Bengal tiger and sat down in deep meditation.

So great were his powers that his thoughts were telegraphed over the many hundreds miles separating his jungle from Delhi, and he gave the Emperor a dream in which he, Gazi Saheb, appeared before the Emperor, surrounded by wild beasts, and announced that he was the owner of the Basre jungles, and that the revenue would be paid from his treasures buried in the forest.

He ordered the Emperor to have the Zamindar of Basre released, threatening him with every misfortune if he disobeyed.

The Emperor woke late next morning and, overtaken by the business of his court, forgot the dream.

The following morning, when he ascended his throne, instead of seeing the usual courtiers and attendants, he found himself like a mother, fearing for her son’s life and sought the assistance of the great Gazi. The fakir promised his aid.

The Zamindar’s house, the Emperor came to know, was surrounded by wild beasts. He immediately remembered his dream, and in great haste ordered the release of the Zamindar.

The animals vanished, and a few weeks later the revenue arrived, paid out of the Gazi’s treasure.

In gratitude for the Gazi’s help, the Zamindar built a mosque in the jungles of Basre, as an abode for the saint; but the Gazi Saheb- who had no use for material possessions and used his mysterious treasure only to assist others, said that he preferred the shelter of the forests in sunshine and rain, and desired neither mosque nor house.

The Zamindar then ordered that every village in his Zamindari should erect an altar dedicated to Gazi Saheb, “King of the Sunderbans and of the Wild Beasts”, and warned his tenants that if they failed to make an offering before entering the jungle they would almost certainly be devoured by tigers or crocodiles.

And so even today, between Calcutta and the Bay of Bengal, the Gazi Saheb is recognized as a saint in many of the villages of the Sunderbans, and his name is held in reverence by both Hindus and Muslims.

There is no record of the Gazi Saheb ever having taken a wife, yet there are a number of fakirs who claim themselves as his descendents, gaining a livelihood from the offerings of boatmen and woodcutters.

That day they do not have the powers of the original Gazi has been apparent more than once, for it is usually the fakirs, and not the village folk, who are carried off by tigers or crocodiles.

Many people have tried to discover the whereabouts of the tomb of Gazi Saheb. Some say it lies near Baruipur, where the saint first took up his abode; others say it is to be found in the jungles of Sagar Island, “by the creek that runs to the sea.”

And there are some who feel certain that there is no tomb that the Gazi Saheb left this earth in no ordinary way, but was taken to Paradise riding on a Royal Bengal Tiger.

Urs,

SRK

You Could Make A Difference!!!


You Could Make A Difference!!! 

 

 Her name was Mrs. Aruna. As she stood in front of her 5th grade class on the very first day of school, she told the children a lie.

 Like most teachers, she looked at her students and said that she loved them all the same.

 But that was impossible, because there in the front row, slumped in his seat, was a little boy named Raja Raman.

 Mrs. Aruna had watched Raja the year before and noticed that he didn’t play well with the other children, that his clothes were messy and that he constantly needed a bath.

 And Raja could be unpleasant. 

It got to the point where Mrs. Aruna would actually take delight in marking his papers with a broad red pen, making bold X’s and then putting a big “F” at the top of his papers.

 At the school where Mrs. Aruna taught, she was required to review each child’s past records and she put Raja’s off until last.

However, when she reviewed his file, she was in for a surprise. 

Raja’s first grade teacher wrote, “Raja is a bright child with a ready laugh. He does his work neatly and has good manners…he is a joy to be around.”

 His second grade teacher wrote, “Raja is an excellent student, well liked by his classmates, but he is troubled because his mother has a terminal illness and life at home must be a struggle.” 

His third grade teacher wrote, “His mother’s death had been hard on him. He tries to do his best, but his father doesn’t show much interest and his home life will soon affect him if some steps aren’t taken.” 

Raja’s fourth grade teacher wrote, “Raja is withdrawn and doesn’t show much interest in school. He doesn’t have many friends and he sometimes sleeps in class.”

By now, Mrs. Aruna realized the problem and she was ashamed of herself. 

She felt even worse when her students brought her New Year presents, wrapped in beautiful ribbons and bright paper, except for Raja’s. 

His present was clumsily wrapped in the heavy, brown paper that he got from a grocery bag. 

Mrs. Aruna took pains to open it in the middle of the other presents. Some of the children started to laugh when she found a rhinestone bracelet with some of the stones missing, and a bottle that was one quarter full of perfume. 

But she stifled the children’s laughter when she exclaimed how pretty the bracelet was, putting it on, and dabbing some of the perfume on her wrist. 

Raja Raman stayed after school that day just long enough to say, “Mrs. Aruna, today you smelled just like my Mom used to”. After the children left she cried for at least an hour.

On that very day, she quit teaching reading, and writing, and arithmetic. Instead, she began to teach children. 

Mrs. Aruna paid particular attention to Raja. As she worked with him, his mind seemed to come alive. The more she encouraged him, the faster he responded.

By the end of the year, Raja had become one of smartest children in the class and, despite her lie that she would love all the children the same, Raja became one of her “teacher’s pets.”

A year later, she found a note under her door, from Raja, telling her that she was the best teacher he ever had in his whole life.

Six years went by before she got another note from Raja. He then wrote that he had finished high school, third in his class, and she was still the best teacher he ever had in his whole life.

Four years after that, she got another letter, saying that while things had been tough at times, he’d stayed in school, had stuck with it, and would soon graduate from college with the highest of honors. 

He assured Mrs. Aruna that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had in his whole life. 

Then four more years passed and yet another letter came. This time he explained that after he got his bachelor’s degree, he decided to go a little further. 

The letter explained that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had. But now his name was little longer – the letter was signed, F. Raman, MD.

The story doesn’t end there. You see, there was yet another letter that spring. Raja said he’d met this girl and was going to be married. 

He explained that his father had died a couple of years ago and he was wondering if Mrs. Aruna might agree to sit in the place at the wedding that was usually reserved for the mother of the groom. 

Of course, Mrs. Aruna did. And guess what? She wore that bracelet, the one with several rhinestones missing. And she made sure she was wearing the perfume that Raja remembered his mother wearing on their last Christmas together.

They hugged each other, and Dr. Raman whispered in Mrs. Aruna’s ear, “Thank you Mrs. Aruna for believing in me. Thank you so much for making me feel important and showing me that I could make a difference.”

Mrs. Aruna, with tears in her eyes, whispered back. She said, “Raja, you have it all wrong. You were the one who taught me that I could make a difference. I didn’t know how to teach until I met you.”

Please remember that wherever you go, and whatever you do, you will have the opportunity to touch and / or change a person’s outlook. Please try to do it in a positive way. 

Urs, 

SRK

Master Plan!!!


Master of Games!!!

An old man who lived in a small side street in the city of Mumbai had to put up with the nuisance of having boys play cricket outside his house, at night.

One evening when the boys were particularly noisy, he went out to talk to them.

He explained that he was a pensioner who was happiest when he could see or hear boys playing his favorite game, cricket. He said he would give them 25 rupees each week to play in the street at night.

The boys were thrilled.

They were being paid to do something they enjoyed.

At the end of the first week they knocked at the old man’s house and asked to be paid.

He did so.

The second week when they asked for payment he said he had run out of money and sent them away with only 15 rupees.

The third week the man said he had not yet received his pension and gave them only 10 rupees.

The boys were very disappointed but there was not much they could do about it.

The fourth week the man said he could not afford to pay them 25 rupees as he had promised, but would give those 5 rupees each week without fail.

This was too much for the boys.

“You expect us to play seven days a week for a measly 5 rupees!” they yelled.

“Go to blazes.”

They stormed away and never played on the street again.

Urs,

SRK

Mango Fruit!!!


The Last Wish!!!

 

Once when King Sri Krishna Deva Rayalu was ruling the Vijaya Nagar Empire, the royal mother fell sick and was bedridden.

The medical professionals of the court declared that there was no chance for her to survive this episode and that she grew too old to respond to any medication.

One morning, she summoned Rayalu to her presence.

“My Dear Son! I realize that I am close to death’s door. I also do not have any hopes that my health would become better. However, I have a last wish.”

She paused and asked, “Can you accomplish it for me before my soul is taken away?”

Rayalu was the King of Kings. His mother was on the deathbed, expressing her last wish.

How could he turn away from it? He gently said, “Mother! Please tell me I will definitely accomplish your last wish” he assured.

“I…” she added, “…wish to eat a mango fruit, can you get me one?” in a feeble tone the mother asked Rayalu.

It was early summer. Trees had just started bearing tender fruits.

There was no guarantee that royal mother would live until the tender ones ripened on the tree, Rayalu thought.

It was also an insult to his royalty, if he was unable to fulfil his mother’s last wish.

Immediately the King ordered his soldiers to scan through the fields of the kingdom and bring some ripe mangoes at any cost, immediately.

The soldiers plunged into action. They did their best and returned with a basket filled with ripe mangoes.

Eventually, just before the soldiers could place the basket before their King, king’s mother breathed her last.

Rayalu was taken aback, for being unable to fulfil the last wish more than for her demise.

He was shook deeply with the thought that his mother was dead even before her quench for mangoes was fulfilled.

He slowly started to sink day after the day with the thoughts that were ripping him.

Rayalu invited Royal Master Thathacharya, explained his struggle, and sought an advice that would take the suffering off from him.

Thathacharya thought for a while and told the King, “My king! Your mother was fond of giving alms to the poor and needy.

Her soul would rest in peace, if you can fulfil her last wish through donations. Order for preparing mangoes with gold and distribute them to Brahmins of the country.”

The news spread like wildfire in the kingdom that Rayalu was doling out golden mangoes to Brahmins in the memory of his mother.

Brahmins from all over the empire started flooding into the capital to accept the golden mango from the King. Day in and out, long queues were always seen only to add people to its tail.

With this, the gold reserves in the exchequer were melting down rapidly.

Rayalu not bothering about the consequences was incessantly involved in donating golden mangoes to the Brahmins.

He never heeded to the pleas and warnings of the Chief Minister Thimmarusu in this regard.

Thimmarusu was in confusion and did not know how to stop the King.

He approached Ramalinga and urged for a solution to this in the interest of the kingdom and its people.

Ramalinga assured Thimmarusu that he would check it at the earliest.

“Go home and have a sound night sleep, Chief Minister. Everything will be alright by tomorrow evening” Ramalinga sent off Thimmarusu.

Next morning, Ramalinga went near the long queues and watched what was happening.

He then selected a yard close to the queues and sat there, ordering the queue maintenance persons to send each of the Brahmins to him before sending him to Rayalu for the golden mango.

Everyone knew that Ramalinga was one of the close associates of the King.

They thought that Ramalinga was doing so on the orders of the King and started sending the Brahmins first to Ramalinga before sending them into the palace.

Ramalinga told every Brahmin that there was a slight amendment to the donation process.

“The King Rayalu wished to donate the golden mangoes to those who bore a blister from him” Ramalinga explained.

Brahmins desirous of the gold first had a burn on their backs and went for the King’s gold.

This went on until afternoon. In the later afternoon, one Brahmin pleaded Ramalinga to give him two burns and two golden mangoes.

Ramalinga immediately fulfilled the Brahmins wish.

Then the Brahmin approached Rayalu. As usual, Rayalu handed him one mango.

The Brahmin immediately requested the King, “My Lord! I had two burns please give me two golden mangoes.”

The King Rayalu did not understand what was happening. He enquired, “What burns?”

Then the Brahmin narrated the entire story about Ramalinga and burns to Rayalu.

The King shivering with anger called for Ramalinga and questioned him, “Ramalinga, what is happening. Why are you doing this brutality on these poor and innocent Brahmins?”

Ramalinga very politely and innocently, as if nothing was amiss, explained. “My Dear King! I am an unlucky person.

Recently my mother succumbed to a chronic disease. She wished all during her bed ridden period to cauterize her back so that she could become healthy and live longer.”

Wiping the tears dropping on his cheeks, Ramalinga continued, “Probably she would have lived. Nevertheless, I did not heed to her requests.

She died with it on her lips. I thought of presenting it to the Brahmins, as I failed to fulfill my mother’s last wish.

However, I being a poor man cannot invite such huge number of Brahmins. Anyway, all of these had come on your invitation and I am trying to fulfill my mother’s last wish in this manner.

With all due respects to the King, I beg for pardon for my deeds, if I am wrong.”

Rayalu analyzed that Ramalinga was attempting to teach him a lesson. He then recalled Thimmarusu’s pleas about the drastically dropping gold reserves in the exchequer.

Appreciating the presence of mind and loyalty, Rayalu immediately stopped the programme.

Urs,

SRK